parent-resource Parents always have been and always will be a primary influence in a child’s education. With many states now using similarly high academic expectations parents who move across the country will have the confidence that their children will have learned the same concepts in the same grade as other students.

These resources provide factual information to help parents navigate the implementation of higher standards and the changes happening in your child’s classroom.

Top Resources

Learning Heroes
Be A Learning Hero helps parents navigate the changes happening in classrooms across the country so they can help their children be successful in school. They provide resources and information for parents from some of the nation’s most well-respected education and parent organizations including the National PTA, Common Sense Media and GreatSchools.

GreatSchools
Compare K-12 school ratings nationwide to find the best schools. View parent ratings, reviews and test scores and choose the right school for your child. They also have a great guide for parents about the Common Core-aligned assessments many states are using. 

BALHNational Urban League Toolkit
The National Urban League has developed a toolkit for parents and advocates, including state-specific fact sheets for several states. The site also discusses why the National Urban League supports high standards.

Get To The Core: Resources for Parents & Teachers
Get to the Core, produced by Stand for Children, walks through what the standards are, and how they are being implemented in each state. The site also give information for teachers, including the voices of teachers speaking about how Common Core has helped them in their classroom.

Guide for Latino Parents
The National Council of La Raza has launched a campaign to Put Our Children First. Their website is full of helpful resources for parents.

Standards Roadmaps for Parents
For parents interested in the specific standards at a grade-by-grade level, the Council of the Great City Schools has provided Parent Roadmaps. Available for both English Language Arts and Literacy and Mathematics, these roadmaps provide grade-by-grade information about the expectations of Common Core standards, including examples of topics and content at each grade level and tips on supporting learning at home. They are all available in both English and Spanish.

Fact Sheets

Common Core Math: Addressing Misconceptions
Common Core math standards have been maligned, misinterpreted, and misunderstood for quite some time. This document will help clarify some key points, due to recent media reports that may have been misleading or confusing.

Common Core: Information and Myths vs. Facts
ASCD has developed a backgrounder on Common Core to help communicate effectively about the standards to fellow educators, parents, and state lawmakers. They have also created a helpful Common Core Myths & Facts publication.

Videos

National PTA President Otha Thornton reflects on the importance of Common Core.

2010 National Teacher of the Year and Teaching Channel Teacher Laureate, Sarah Brown Wessling explains what’s different about new state assessments, what it means for students, and how they have an impact on her work in the classroom.

Father and U.S. Military Veteran shares his thoughts on the Common Core State Standards

Also on our recommended reading list

Salon: “You’re wrong about Common Core math: Sorry, parents, but it makes more sense than you think”
Several confusing problems that have gone viral have stirred concerns about math instruction under Common Core State Standards, but the new framework is helping students develop a stronger understanding of math skills, writes Jim Goodman, an Ohio math teacher. “All of these criticisms boil down to a fundamental misunderstanding of the Common Core State Standards,” Goodman writes.” (Continue reading here.)

Collaborative For Student Success: “Breaking Up with My iPhone Calculator, and other Math Thoughts”
“To many of us who learned multiplication through rote memorization only, the Common Core’s emphasis on understanding the why behind math is unusual, if not altogether foreign. But there is a strong rationale for this shift in approach.” (Continue reading here.)